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Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2007 10:53 pm 
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Welcome to DrMoreau's Public Domain Movie Madness Premier!

You may have seen the trailers for the new Will Smith movie: I Am Legend. Looks cool doesn't it? Well, it has been done before ... and redone; and now done again. The original starred Vincent Price in an American International production of the Ubaldo Ragona film: "The Last Man On Earth," in 1964. It was remade again in the 1971, this time called "The Omega Man," and starring Charlton Heston. Now, all 3 of these versions proclaim Richard Matheson as the writer based on his novel. The themes are all the same, a lone man is the solve untainted man on the planet versus a world of vampires. However, in 1924, a silent movie with the same name, "The Last man On Earth" - similar plot sans vampire for women in need of a fertile man. However, we're here for the Vincent Price film.


As the thread title implies - this is in the public domain. For those who don't know the term, it means that it isn't owned (Copyright or Legally) by anyone other than John Q. Public, you know, you and me. So without further ado, from American International and Ubaldo Ragona, Starring Vincent Price, The Last Man On Earth.


*****Feature Presentation:*****


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Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2007 11:01 pm 
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I have this on DVD, but haven't watched it in a while. I'll have to pull it out again before I go see I Am Legend. As for Omega Man, I haven't seen that one in forever. I'll have to see if Netflix has it.


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Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2007 11:04 pm 
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I watched the first 15 minutes or so of this one a couple of days ago here, and I will get around to watching it all, very soon.

I had a phone call interrupt my "theatre experience". :clap:


Looks decent, at least interesting from what I have seen.


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Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 5:47 pm 
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bkirby wrote:
I have this on DVD, but haven't watched it in a while. I'll have to pull it out again before I go see I Am Legend. As for Omega Man, I haven't seen that one in forever. I'll have to see if Netflix has it.

They do...and it sucks...

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Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 7:16 pm 
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Well, it's at the top of my queue now. :)


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Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2007 1:00 pm 
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I've seen this before.
I love Vincent Price

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Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2007 6:52 pm 
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DrMoreau's Public Domain Movie Madness: Week 2


This week we have a lost Cult Classic - Tod Browning's 1932 "Freaks." For those of you who aren't familiar with Tod Brownings work, he was the director who brought us such classic films as: London After Midnight, The Thirteenth Chair, The Unknown, Mark of the Vampire, West of Zanzibar, Outside the Law, and most notably, 1931's Dracula. Browning was a director in high demand. He worked in the Business since 1915, starting at the age of 34, when he was discovered by D. W. Griffith. He had initially started as an actor, but liked the behind the scenes better. Did about 2 dozen typical silent 3 reeler's before he started having creative control and was able to Direct/Produce/Adapt works that interested him. He worked with such legends as: Edward G. Robinson, Lionel Barrymore, Joan Crawford, Wallace Beery, Bela Lugosi, and many many times with Lon Chaney Sr. He was the Hitchcock/Spielberg of his day - until he made this film. Freaks basically killed his career. He only mad 4 more films after this, one of them uncredited for fear of public backlash.

Browning made this film for many reasons, it had a good moral, was creepy, and showed a side of the circus very few got to see. In his early life Browning had worked for a traveling circus and it left a most impressionable imprint on him. Rather than use make-up and special effects as he had done with many of his other films, he cast real "Side Show Freaks" in this morality tale. The images of real "freaks" so upset the general public, this film became suppressed and outright banned for decades in Europe and America. Keep in mind, most if not all of these people, are real performers and not actors. They had real deceases and deformities. Even though there is very little to no horror in this movie, it was billed and has been distributed that way since its release. Don't get me wrong, it is damn creepy, especially the ending, but it is a tolerance and morality tale that sets the old adage: Never Judge A Book By Its Cover on its ear. A true masterpiece that would sweep at Cannes and Golden Globes today, however, was near forgotten until the 1990's when it was restored before it was lost forever - much like London After Midnight.

So, without further ado, Tod Browning's 1 hour Lost Classic - Freaks.


*****FEATURE PRESENTATION*****


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Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2007 8:47 pm 
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I love this f@%king film!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 12:33 am 
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Such a classic! (Freaks, not the Vincent Price feature-though surely I love Price he always gave his all.)

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Watched my DVD of The Last Man on Earth today... Yeah, I love VP, but this isn't one of my favorite VP flicks. Still looking forward to the Will Smith thing.


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Unread postPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2007 3:56 am 
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Both of the public domain movies posted so far are great, The Last man on Earth is very entertaining and impressive considering how it was made on a shoe string budget, I do prefer The Omega Man but that's 1 of my favourite movies ever so no comparison for me.

As for Tod Browning's Freaks, I remember when I first watched it some years ago, being a big fan of Dracula and knowing it's reputation having been banned for so many years in the UK I was really looking forward to seeing it and wasn't disappointed, all the so called 'freaks' give good perfomances and the ending is equally both shocking and comical.


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Unread postPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2007 9:37 am 
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"Freaks" just played on TCM awhile back and my young children sat mesmerized by it! Imagine that, a 75 year old movie having an effect today! Not many made today will be able to say that!
It is a great morality lesson too. My kids kept asking about all the "different" people and we told them everyone is special and deserves respect. No one should ever make fun of anyone like the lady does in this.
The ending is AWESOME! The shadows and lighting and rain and the scene under the stairs and everyone coming out......fantastic!
I would imagine George Romero was inspired by this film for his own "Night of the Living Dead"....

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Unread postPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2007 9:50 am 
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Now that's inspiring, Woodrow. I've always found it hard to believe that in any time period a tale of morality and fortitude - as presented in Freaks - could ever be banned simply because of the actors deformities. Whereas we all learned in this finely crafted tale, it was the "normal and beautiful people" that were the true freaks. Perhaps that was the ultimately too shocking reason for its being banned.


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Unread postPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2007 10:00 am 
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So true good Dr.
I forgot to mention also that MGM for YEARS did not have Leo the Lion or their logo at the beginning of it because they were ashamed of it. How truly sad! I guess they missed the whole damn point!

It is also a complete waste of talent that he stopped making films in 1939 and yet lived until 1962! I wonder what he did the rest of his life? He could have been entertaining us even more that is for sure!

You know another great Browning film is "The Devil-Doll" with fantastic special effects for 1936. It starred Lionel Barrymore in his most bizarre role, even in drag! It is great and quite creepy.....

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Unread postPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2007 8:55 pm 
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Speaking of Tod Browning-has anyone here ever seen The Unknown, another Browning directed feature from 1927? Starred Lon Chaney Sr. It's a silent feature and might also be in the public domain now.

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Quote:
You know another great Browning film is "The Devil-Doll" with fantastic special effects for 1936. It starred Lionel Barrymore in his most bizarre role, even in drag! It is great and quite creepy.....


Excellent film. Lionel plays a great old woman/escaped convict fulfilling his dead comrades final experiments. Another creepy role, like what wasn't, for character actress, Rafaela Ottiano. I am pretty sure she had her entire career based on this kind of scary character type. Great film effects that was in use some 40 ~ 50 years later until computer CGI came along.

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Speaking of Tod Browning-has anyone here ever seen The Unknown, another Browning directed feature from 1927? Starred Lon Chaney Sr. It's a silent feature and might also be in the public domain now.


Well, for fear of turning this into a Tod Browning Film Retrospective, I would love to go on and on about this movie. A true classic silent with a very young and hot - pre Mommy Dearest - Joan Crawford. However, since you did inquire Mr. Burgundy - yes, it is available. Unfortunately, I can only perma-link to the video rather than make it a featured presentation. There are 3 links, each about 20 minutes in length. For those unfamiliar with the story - we have (1) of 10 performances Browning and Chaney did together, and this movie is pretty evident why. Another example of Browning's love affair with the circus, this time around a gypsy circus, and a bit of a prelude to "Freaks" in sort. This time, Lon Chaney is Alonzo, the freak with no arms who finds a lovely Nanon is drawn to him for that singular distinction. Men have always tried to touch, paw, or beat her with their vile and nasty hands. But the things he can do with his feet ...

Anyway, here is Tod Browning's Silent Masterpiece with Lon Chaney and Joan Crawford ... The Unknown.



Part 1: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x16h4o ... -1_extreme
Part 2: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x16hn6 ... shortfilms
Part 3: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x16hvw ... shortfilms


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Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2007 12:20 pm 
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Also, Ron TCM plays "The Unknown" every once in awhile and it is on DVD and well worth it

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Thank you both! I actually caught the film on TCM Woodrow-I felt privileged to have seen it as I don't have the time I might like to seek out unique viewing experiences.

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Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2007 10:11 pm 
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DrMoreau's Public Domain Movie Madness: Week 3


Since I have listed to one of my favorite silent movies that I was unable to post as a featured PD Film, I am going with another Silent film that holds its place in the 100 greatest movies of all time. This time we are going with a comedy that I think a few members may find very enjoyable, I of course am referring to: Buster Keaton's - The General. This is a wonderful little movie set at the beginning of the Civil war, where we find our hero - Buster Keaton as Johnnie - trying to win the love of his sweetheart, Annabelle Lee. When Fort Sumner is fired upon, Annabelle's father and brother hurry off to join the Confederate Army. Johnnie, a bit reluctant, tries to enroll but is found 4F. She however, doesn't know this and believes him to be a coward. A little later on, Johnnie learns of a Union Plan to steal the famous and glorious steam engine train: The General. To thwart the Union Army, he steals the train 1st. Note: This story is loosely based on an actual occurance.

This is a very funny slapstick comedy that should please viewers today. The comic timing is wonderful. As always, Keaton performs his own stunts, that even today would be hard to get insurance coverage for. For those of you who may only know Buster from his Twilight Zone episode, you will get a treat here. This landmark film not only solidified him as a comic/action star of the silent days, it pushed the envelope to his counterparts - Chaplin, Fairbanks, Lloyd, etc - to match his daring as both an actor/comic and as a star.

So, without further ado, sit back, lower the lights, microwave some popcorn and enjoy Buster Keaton's wonderful Silent Film - The General


****FEATURE PRESENTATION****


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Unread postPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 2:18 pm 
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What can I say good Doctor?
One of the best of this underrated genius and one of many many awesome films he made! Thanks!
I just love him, but no one knew that!! :lol:

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Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2007 4:21 pm 
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DrMoreau's Public Domain Movie Madness: Week 4

GRIND HOUSE DOUBLE FEATURE


All right people, this week, being Christmas, I thought I'd offer up a double feature for us all. Before Tarantino and Rodriguez, the were the original Grind House films. You know, those independent shock/schlock films from the 60's. They were mean, gritty, and cheap - but generally not that bad - just not good enough for a main production. Tonight we have (2) films featuring the Grind House Golden Boy - Arch Hall, Jr.

Feature#1: Wild Guitar, made in 1962, and set in Hollywood features Arch Hall Jr as Bud Eagle, wannabe Rocker who falls in with a sleazy Record Producer, Mike McCauley - Arch Hall Sr. For our old Hollywood impresarios, you'll recognize many of the famous landmarks including "Dino's Lodge" - made famous by 77 Sunset Strip - where Bud Eagle even stops and combs his hair ala Edd "Kookie" Byrnes. Keep in mind this is supposed to be a rock and roll parody and intentionally funny. Well it is, just not in the appropriate parts. A love sick girlfriend who gets kidnapped by 3 wannabe stooges. 4 Lipped Sink early sixties rock songs that - even though they are being premiered for the 1st time, the girls in the audience know all the words and lip sync along. Hell, even the band knows his original song at his first introduction. If only backing bands were that good today.

Feature#2: The Sadist, made the following year, 1963, is above and beyond a better film visually. It is also note worthy because it was the 1st time the Starkweather/Fugate thrill kill killers were portrayed on celluloid. Sure they would be made 10 years later in "Badlands" and then again in the 90's with "Natural Born Killers" - but Arch Hall Jr. was the 1st. The plot is (3) Lancaster Teachers are traveling to Dodger Stadium when their car breaks down and they pull into a side road garage. Unfortunately, Charlie and Judy made it their 1st and killed the attendant and his wife. They then begin their psycho terror on the (3) teachers. Now, this movie has a lot going for it. Great cinematography by a soon to be major player in the industry, Vilmos Zsigmond - Deliverance, The Deer Hunter, etc. Very tight direction and pacing keeps this both tense and entertaining. Pay close attention to Arch Hall's character and giggle - he based it off an older movie star that some of you may recognize. A friend of this writer also co-stars in the movie as Ed Stiles. Fine and funny gentleman who I've thrown a few back with at a local watering hole.


So, without further ado, from Fairway & Rushmore Films, starring Arch Hall, Jr - Wild Guitar and The Sadist.

****WILD GUITAR****



****THE SADIST****


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Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2008 11:17 pm 
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DrMoreau's Public Domain Movie Madness: Week 5


Hitchcock


Welcome to Jamaica Inn, circa early 19th century, location: Cornwall. An adaptation of the Daphne Du Maurier novel, comes this 1939 classic Hitch film. Maureen O'Hara is Mary Yellen, a teen-age girl recently orphaned and sent to live with relatives on the Cornish Moors. Enter, Charles Laughton as Sir Humphrey Pengallan. Although Laughton play a country gentleman, have no doubts, he is the villain of our story. Leading a band of modern-day pirates, they lure passing boats into the rocky coastal waters and wait for the passengers and crew to parish. Once the deed is done, they simply collect the cargo and smuggle the goods away. But nothing in a Hitchcock film is ever that easy and cut and dry.

This is the 1st pairing of Laughton and O'Hara, preceding their more renown teaming as Quasimodo and Esmeralda in, "The Hunchback of Notre Dame." This is O'Hara's 3rd Film, 1st starring, and is at a young tender age of 19. Another 1st here is Miss Joan Harrison, who started as Hitchcock's secretary and this was a book she had read and wrote the synopsis for. This is her 1st script, but not her last with Hitch. She would also go on to produce some of the AHP series. Being her 1st script, it isn't the typical depth that you would later find in Rebbecca, Saboteur, Suspicion, and Foreign Correspondent, but for the 1st time out the gate, it is pretty strong. This is also the 1st Daphne Du Maurier Novel adaptation Hitch would make, followed the next year by Rebbecca. Now to break the run of firsts, this is Hitchcock's last UK film for Mayflower Pictures.

All in all, a good story, well delivered but by no means Hitchcock's best, hence, it has fallen into the realm of public domain. However, it is a Hitch film and truly deserves to be seen as a stand alone from his more involving films. This has the unfortunate and dubious honor to be the film between "The Lady Vanishes" and "Rebbecca," both far more memorable films. However, as stated, this is a fine little melodrama in it's own right. Laughton is villainous and perverse. The story holds ones attention and indeed does what this movie was intended to do, take you to a different time and frame of mind. So, without any further ado, from 1939, Alfred Hitchcock, and Mayflower Films:


***** JAMAICA INN *****


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Unread postPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 1:26 am 
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DrMoreau's Public Domain Movie Madness: Week 6


Hitchcock Continued


The Man Who Knew Too Much - the 1935 Classic Version.

Bob and Jill Lawrence are on a winter holiday with their teenage daughter Betty in Switzerland. Suddenly, their mutual French friend Louis Bernard is shot as he danced with Jill. His dying words warn of an impending assassination about to take place in London. Believing that their conspiracy has been jeopardized, the assassins then kidnap teenage Betty as a bargaining chip to insure the silence of the Lawrence's. However, Bob and "I can shoot they eye off a penny" Jill return to London with a plan of their own - one that involves getting their daughter back and stopping the assassination.

Gotta love this early black & white version. We have a young Peter Lorre in his first English film. For most audiences, this was their first exposure to this mainly German Star but it wouldn't be their last. Sure, Hitch went on and remade this one 20 years later, but this still holds up as a strong and equally compelling version that shows what Hitch was about to become in the menu of Suspense Film history. Those who watched Jamaica Inn, you may recognize Leslie Banks as Bob Laurence. Of particular interest to our TZ fans will be, Edna Best as Jill Laurence - she is the mother of Sarah Marshall from "Little Girl Lost."

All in all, a really compelling story a nice ending. In a lot of ways, I prefer this over the 1956 remake. There is more edge to it and being pre World War II it holds a different impact on the scene at hand. So, without further ado, from Alfred Hitchcock - the master of suspense - PtE is proud to present:


The Man Who Knew Too Much


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DrMoreau's Public Domain Movie Madness: Week 7


The Comedy of Terrors


The year is 1964 - January - and what does American International have in-store for its audiences? Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Boris Karloff and Basil Rathbone in: A Comedy of Terrors. Brought to you by none other than James H. Nicholson & Samuel Z. Arkoff. God I loved their Horror and shoe-string budget movies. Written by Richard Matheson and directed by - no not Rodger Corman but Jacques Tourneur.

Who the Hell is Jacques Tourneur? Well, the name be unfamiliar to some but his work is renown. Cat People (1942), I Walked with a Zombie (1943), The Flame and the Arrow (1950), Night of the Demon (1957), The City Under the Sea (1965), and for our Twilight Zone Fans, a little episode entitled, "Night Call" which aired a mere 16 days after this film; also written by Richard Matheson. Although those films and credits listed are not his only works, they are the ones that I have seen and hold a fondness for. Fine director that never really made a huge name for himself but his films are still studied today.

As the title implies, this is indeed a black comedy - not quite Poe - but definitely influenced by some of his works and macabre humor. Vincent Price is an undertaker, Waldo Trumbull, who has run low on customers. Being behind in rent by almost a year, he and his assistant, Lorre, need to find some customers - whether they are in need of their service at the time or not. Sound familiar? Based on several versions of the Burke & Hare murders that all of these men have appeared in during their career. Place them altogether an it's classic in the works. For some added fun, we have Joe E. Brown as the Cemetery Keeper. His large mouth and facial gestures could steal the scene from any group of performers without saying a word. For our "eye candy" devotees - and you know who you are - we have the lovely Miss Joyce Jameson, Beverly Powers, Linda Rogers, and Luree Holmes. If a lot of cute girls with bare cleavage is what you expect from and AI film - then you won't be disappointed.


So, without further ado. From American International - Produced by James H. Nicholson & Samuel Z. Arkoff - in a Jacques Tourneur film - PtE is proud to present:




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DrMoreau's Public Domain Movie Madness: Week 8


Things to Come


Here is a little gem that was brought up in the Favorite Sci-Fi movie section that our pal, whitsbrain, commented he hadn't seen. Well, lets correct that situation.

A 1936 Classic, based on the pen of H. G. Wells - an in turn - screen-played by H. G. as it is based on his story - The Shape of Things to Come. This is a futuristic look at what we can expect as visualized by H. G. prior to the on set of WWII. Set in the fictitious English town of "Everytown" - clever - as we progress through the ages. War breaks out in 1940 - little did he know how right he would be - and we continue up to 2036. Several key players have multiple roles portraying both present and future generational descendants. A lot of common place Wells theme occur in this - long wars that people forgot the reason it began, Elitist commands that pit Hill People VS City folk VS sky people, gas warfare, humanity moving underground and establishing society there, and eventually space flight to conquer space.

Now, although this is/was and Alexander Korda production {most notably known for his "The Private Life of ..." films} it is said that H. G. had almost complete control over this film. From movie posters, locations, cast, etc, he was at the helm of this film. Not surprisingly - this has a quaint feel to it in todays standards of SciFi, but remember, this is 72 years old. This has a very familiar cast to the members of PtE: Raymond Massey, Cedric Hardwicke, & Ralph Richardson. Notably extras that don't appear in the credits are: George Sanders, Abraham Sofaer and Terry-Thomas. As most any PtE member knows, Abraham Sofaer was in TOL - Demon with a Glass Hand and Kolchak - Horror in the Heights. Fun to see him here when he was considerably younger. Same too can be said of Hardwicke.

However, without further ado, from H. G. Wells and 1936: Things to Come



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Unread postPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2009 2:23 pm 
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DrMoreau's Public Domain Movie Madness: Week 9


Cat-Women of the Moon
aka
Rocket To The Moon


Here is another little gem that "So Bad - It's Good." I've seen this movie under both titles, but for obvious reasons, I prefer Cat-Women over Rocket in the title. Typically, whenever you see "Rocket" in the title, it is the 3D version of this film - which doesn't make it any better - just 3D.

What makes this film work?

    1st: Our Director, Arthur Hilton. Who - you may be asking? Arthur Hilton. Surely not a house-hold name but a major player in the history of Television. This guy directed 54 episodes of the original "Lassie," "Mission Impossible," Hawaii-5-O," Rifleman," "Wanted: Dead or Alive," etc. A man with abundant talent during a time when TV wasn't as rewarded as Movies were. He knows how to keep things moving and fluid, which is often difficult with some of the scripts he had to work with. And Cat-Women is no exception.

    2nd: Our Cast. Mainly no-one of note, with maybe the exception of Marie Windsor. Who? You'll instantly recognize her when you see her. The rest of the cast you may know as character actors from such shows as Twilight Zone, Kolchak, The Virginian, Bonanza, Gunsmoke, etc. Being that there is no real star to sell this film on name alone, it provides for a fun generic scifi outing.

    3rd: Our Score is provided by a young Mr. Elmer Bernstein, I shite you not. This film goes to prove that even some of Hollywood's greats all had their meager beginnings. Great score even for this film.

    4th: Matte Paintings of the lunar landscapes. These were done by Chesley Bonestell - who would become the most used outer space illustrator during the 50's and 60's. His stuff was the reference and source for what the moon and other planet landscapes should look like. Even NASA used his work. Odd bit of trivia - he was so well respected that there is a crater on Mars and an Asteroid named ofter him.

    5th: Sets Decoration by Fay Babcock. Ok, sure the rocket ship set sucked, corrugated aluminum, wooden desks, standard office roller chairs with seat belts that defied the laws of gravity and physics - but, the lunar sets are breath-taking for a budget B film. Creative and dynamic, these really help sell the picture in the long run.

    6th: Hot chicks in black leotards. Now, if I have to face alien adversaries, these are the ones I want to fight. :evil:

Now, the science in this fiction is a little weak ... ok, a lot weak - but that's what adds to the charm. I'd say within the 1st 15 minutes you'll have more than a dozen laughs on how badly their science really was. But hey, it's 1953, what did we know, right? The special effects aren't so special, the script is sorely cliche, but the MST3K value is top notch.

So, without further ado, from Arthur Hilton and 1953: Cat-Women of the Moon



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Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:15 pm 
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Man, this movie is a hoot! :lol: I sort of skimmed through it, but the parts I saw were amazing examples of bad acting, poor writing, incompetent direction, and unintentional humor.

This thing is almost as much fun as The Green Slim! :D

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Unread postPosted: Wed May 19, 2010 12:40 pm 
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cool tool for the fool :dance:


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Unread postPosted: Wed May 19, 2010 12:42 pm 
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Hey Doc, just wanted to tell you Flash-Candy is closing, probably June 1.


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Unread postPosted: Wed May 19, 2010 8:10 pm 
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Giant wrote:
Hey Doc, just wanted to tell you Flash-Candy is closing, probably June 1.


Well that's a damn shame, Giant. You're always welcome to post here. What'll happen with the Sunday site?


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Unread postPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2011 2:13 pm 
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What's flash candy? Oh yeah and I was surprised to find out that Night of the Living Dead is a public domain movie? Is it true there's only one or two DVD releases of the film that are considered any good, including one with a personal message written by Romero to fans on the back cover. So which is the best one to get?


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Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2011 8:58 am 
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Anthony wrote:
What's flash candy? Oh yeah and I was surprised to find out that Night of the Living Dead is a public domain movie? Is it true there's only one or two DVD releases of the film that are considered any good, including one with a personal message written by Romero to fans on the back cover. So which is the best one to get?


Quote:
WIKIPEDIA...
Revisions

Image

The film has been subject to numerous revisions. This screenshot is from the 2004 colorized version.The first revisions of Night of the Living Dead involved colorization by home video distributors. Hal Roach Studios released a colorized version in 1986 that featured ghouls with pale green skin. Another colorized version appeared in 1997 from Anchor Bay Entertainment with grey-skinned zombies. In 2004, Legend Films produced a new colorized version. Technology critic Gary W. Tooze wrote that "The colorization is damn impressive", but noticed the print used was not as sharp as other releases of the film. In 2009, Legend Films coproduced a colorized 3-D version of the film with PassmoreLab, a company that converts 2-D film into 3-D format. This version will receive a full theatrical release in Europe, followed by a limited theatrical release in the United States. According to Legend Films founder Barry Sandrew, Night of the Living Dead is the first entirely live action 2-D film to be converted to 3-D.

In 1999, co-writer John A. Russo released a modified version called Night of the Living Dead: 30th Anniversary Edition. He filmed additional scenes and recorded a revised soundtrack composed by Scott Vladimir Licina. In an interview with Fangoria magazine, Russo explained that he wanted to "give the movie a more modern pace". Russo took liberties with the original script. The additions are neither clearly identified nor even listed. However, Entertainment Weekly reported "no bad blood" between Russo and Romero. The magazine, however, quoted Romero as saying, "I didn't want to touch Night of the Living Dead". Critics panned the revised film, notably Harry Knowles of Ain't It Cool News. Knowles promised to permanently ban anyone from his publication who offered positive criticism of the film. A sequel called Children of the Living Dead followed in 2001.



Soooo my advice...is to stay the hell away from the 30th anniversary edition. Russo put in a bunch of new scenes and looked horrible and is such crap that you could tell everytime because it was so damn noticeable and tacky.


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Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2011 4:37 pm 
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Anthony wrote:
What's flash candy?


Flash Candy aka Digital Drive In was a site hosted by a member here - Giant - with a similar name on that site. He had lots of movies similar to ours and a blog style commentary to it.


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Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2011 8:55 pm 
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So basically, I should opt for the one that has Romero's signature on the back cover of the DVD?

This one right?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-media ... F8&index=0

http://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-media ... F8&index=1

http://www.amazon.com/Night-Living-Mill ... 968&sr=8-3

I can't say I'm really surprised. A review I read on Amazon said that Elite Entertinment also did the best DVD release and transfer of the original Evil Dead as well.


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Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 12, 2011 9:04 am 
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Anthony wrote:
I can't say I'm really surprised. A review I read on Amazon said that Elite Entertinment also did the best DVD release and transfer of the original Evil Dead as well.


If you still dont have your original VHS copy of Evil Dead...it aint worth it. :evil:


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Unread postPosted: Wed Jul 13, 2011 5:40 pm 
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So I should get it on VHS? How come? Better picture and sound? No good extras on any DVD releases of Evil Dead?


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Unread postPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 12:06 am 
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Thanks! Also, check out http://www.archive.org.


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Unread postPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 9:32 am 
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DrMoreau's Movie Madness lies dormant for two years now. :(


RESURRECTION!!!!! RESURRECTION!!!


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Unread postPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 10:40 am 
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anton wrote:
Thanks! Also, check out http://www.archive.org.


Yep - a lot of the Archive ends up here on the board. You can use the SWF BB Tag to post. A fine example is Cat-women of the Moon (this thread) and Horror Hotel (View and Review Movies).

PS: Welcome to PtEForums, Anton :D


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Unread postPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 12:35 pm 
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DrMoreau's Public Domain Movie Madness: Week 10

The Shadow Strikes


A 1937 Classic, based on the the Radio and Pulp Magazine Detective - The Shadow. This is the 1st movie adaption and is played by Rod La Rocque. He would be the first but certainly not the last. He played the Shadow twice, here in 1937 then again in 1938. Victor Jory would play the role once in 1940, to be followed by Kane Richmond 3 times - all in 1946. Although Victor Jory is the most remembered Shadow due to the Serial/Movie in 1940, Rod and Kane stick in my mind most as they were the 1st I was exposed to during my youth and rainy Saturday afternoon matinee TV. Before Bruce Wayne/Batman donned a cape and fought crime as a rich, influential vigilante detective, Lamont Cranston protected the people as The Shadow. A man with psychic abilities and money/power to provide a good alter ego.

Without further ado, from 1937 and Grand National Pictures: Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men ... The Shadow knows!




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