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Unread postPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2012 4:06 pm 
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Cliff Osmond, 75, was a prolific character actor on film and TV and an acting instructor who estimated that he had taught more than 10,000 actors. Osmond died December 22nd of pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles. He appeared in many films, including four Billy Wilder comedies:
The Fortune Cookie
Kiss Me, Stupid
The Front Page
Irma La Douce

He also appeared on television more than 100 times over four decades including the Twilight Zone episode of The Gift as Manolo, several Gunsmoke, Kojak, All in the Family, Land of the Giants, The Odd Couple, Police Story, and many others.

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 8:15 pm 
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By Marisa Gerber, Los Angeles Times
January 5, 2013, 7:18 p.m.


On a December night in 1954, Los Angeles met the woman it would soon deem too hot for television.

After the success of Vampira, the glamorous ghoul of 1950s late-night TV, executives at KABC-TV (Channel 7) cast Gloria Pall, a showgirl and model, as Voluptua, the sultry hostess of a new, love-themed movie program.

Fans dubbed the statuesque Pall "Eyeful Tower" and "Miss Cleavage" for her shapely figure and plunging necklines. Her steamy on-camera poses and flirtatious comments soon earned her another moniker: "Corruptua."

Just seven weeks after it first aired, amid mounting pressure from religious and PTA groups and lackluster commercial sponsorship, the station abruptly canceled the show.

Pall, who went on to become a Los Angeles real estate agent, died Dec. 30 of heart failure at a Burbank hospital, her son, Jefferson Kane, said. She was 85.

R.H. Greene, a Los Angeles author and documentary filmmaker who put together a 2011 radio feature on Voluptua for KPCC-FM (89.3), called Pall a television pioneer.

"She was quite openly in touch with her sexuality, and that was an incredibly dangerous thing to do," Greene said in an interview Friday. "We don't have too many stories for that time that illustrate that, and Gloria's does."

Each Wednesday night, as the show's romantic theme song played, Pall slinked across Southland TV screens wearing an evening gown and dragging a fur coat.

Before she introduced the week's romantic flick, she greeted viewers with a breathy coo: "Welcome to my boudoir, I want you to feel that it's your special hideaway. Relax, take off your shoes, loosen your tie."

She caressed a bearskin rug, made silhouetted on-camera costume changes behind a translucent screen and answered a phone that didn't ring. Instead, it sighed her name: "Voluptua…Voluptua."

As she signed off, by now clad only in a men's pajama top, she kissed the camera goodbye.

"You put that on television and people went crazy," Greene said. "They were simultaneously titillated and appalled. Gloria was way too hot to handle."

In a posting on her website, Pall described the over-the-top character she created as "just suggestive — corny not porny."

The show's risque theme and the protests it drew attracted national media attention. In 1955, Pall was featured in photo spreads in Playboy and Life.

Born Gloria Pallatz on July 15, 1927, in Brooklyn, New York, Pall grew up in poverty, her son said. As a teenager, she worked as an aircraft mechanic and as a filing clerk for the United Service Organization. She said later that she was working at the organization's office on the 56th floor of the Empire State Building on July 28, 1945, when an Army B-25 bomber crashed into the building.

"It threw me across the room, and I landed against the wall," Pall told National Public Radio in 2008. "We didn't know if it was a bomb or what happened. It was terrifying."

In 1947, she won the Miss Flatbush beauty contest in her hometown and then worked as a model.

After stints as a showgirl in Reno and Las Vegas, she moved to Hollywood, where she landed small but memorable roles.

In an iconic image from the 1957 film "Jailhouse Rock," Pall's legs frame Elvis Presley's face at a burlesque show; she clutches Kirk Douglas' arm in a scene from 1954's "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea"; and in "Crimson Kimono," a classic 1959 film noir, Pall played a stripper named Sugar Torch, who gets shot in the opening scene.

In her 30s, her film roles growing scarce, Pall started studying for a real estate license.

"I decided that I ought to do something with my life besides going to parties and doing occasional modeling work," she told The Times in 1962, adding, "I've finally got my name in lights on the Strip."

Indeed, the sign outside her lavender-hued real estate office on Sunset read simply: "Call Pall."

In 1965, Pall married Allen Kane, who owned a Ford dealership in North Hollywood. The couple, who later divorced, moved with their young son to Florida and Atlanta before returning to California in the late 1970s.

Pall, who drove a lavender 1957 Ford Thunderbird and dressed mainly in shades of purple, later wrote and self-published several books about her life.

"She just knew so much about the '50s," her son said. "Those were her glory days."

A memorial is planned for 3 p.m. Jan. 20 at Calvary Baptist Church in Burbank, 724 S. Glenoaks Blvd.

Asked toward the end of her life what she would say to those who campaigned to get Voluptua off the air, Pall laughed and offered three words: "Get a life."

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 10:12 pm 
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RIP Gloria :cry:


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Unread postPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 3:46 pm 
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Goodnight Ms. Gloria. :cry:

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Unread postPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 3:28 pm 
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Jeanne Cooper of ‘The Young and the Restless’ Dies at 84



Legendary soap star Jeanne Cooper of “The Young and the Restless” died Wednesday morning at the age of 84.

Cooper had been hospitalized in April for an infection and had been battling an undisclosed illness.

Her son Corbin Bernsen, who stars on USA’s “Psych,” announced Cooper’s death Wednesday on Twitter.‏

“Mom passed this morning. She was in peace and without fear. U all have been incredible in your love. In her name share it 2 day with others,” Bernsen wrote.

Cooper played “Y&R’s” wealthy matriarch Katherine Chancellor for a remarkable 40 years, first joining the CBS daytime drama in 1973. She earned nine Daytime Emmy nominations for Outstanding Leading Actress for the role, which gave her four husbands, several bouts with alcoholism, a secret child, an on-screen facelift and a look-alike doppelganger named Marge!



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Unread postPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 4:23 pm 
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Wow Jeanne Cooper, as in Liz Smith in Mr. Denton on Doomsday? I didn't realize she was on Y&R, and a prominent character too! I also didn't know Corbin Bernsen was her son. Wow.

Goodnight, Ms. Cooper.

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Unread postPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 10:09 pm 
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Goodnight Ms. Cooper. :cry:

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Unread postPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 10:18 pm 
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Yeah, I'm a big Psych fan and post on their message board so I just heard about this on their page. 84 is about average in this day and age.


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Unread postPosted: Thu May 23, 2013 6:54 pm 
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Steve Forrest, who starred as Lt. Dan “Hondo” Harrelson on the 1970s ABC action series S.W.A.T., died peacefully surrounded by family on May 18 in Thousand Oaks, Calif. He was 87.
In a career spanning more than 60 years, Forrest frequently was cast as a leading man or “heavy.” An aficionado of the American Western, he delighted in roles that glorified the genre, including guest-starring appearances on such television classics as The Virginian, Bonanza and Gunsmoke.

But it was his role as the hard-hitting yet warmhearted Harrelson on the Aaron Spelling and Leonard Goldberg-produced S.W.A.T. that most endeared Forrest to the American audience. As the leader of the police department’s five-man special weapons and tactics team, he often was seen with his bullhorn in hand, jumping into the large dark gray van and shouting the signature line “Let’s roll!”

As a salute to the show, which aired from February 1975 to April 1976 for 37 episodes, Forrest appeared in a cameo role as the van driver in the film version of S.W.A.T. (2003) that starred Samuel L. Jackson and Colin Farrell.

Forrest was born William Forrest Andrews on Sept. 25, 1925, in Huntsville, Texas, to Annis and Charles Andrews, a Baptist minister. He was the youngest of 13 children; one of his brothers was famed actor Dana Andrews, the star of Laura and The Best Years of Our Lives, who died in 1992.

At 18, Forrest enlisted in the military and served with the Army. He attained the rank of sergeant during World War II and fought in the Battle of the Bulge. At the end of the war, he moved to Los Angeles and attended UCLA.

Forrest graduated with honors from UCLA in 1950 with a bachelor’s degree in theater arts and went to work as a stagehand at the La Jolla Playhouse outside San Diego. It was there, during the summer stock production of Goodbye Again, that he was discovered by Hollywood legend Gregory Peck. The actor cast him in the production and arranged for his first screen test with MGM, where he was placed under contract.

In 1953, Forrest garnered a New Star of the Year award from the Golden Globes for his performance in the Warner Bros. film So Big, playing opposite Jane Wyman and Sterling Hayden. Throughout the ’50s, Forrest landed roles on both the large and small screens, frequently cast on such early TV series as Playhouse 90, Climax! Theater, Lux Video Theater and Alfred Hitchcock Presents.

His early films included roles as a P.O.W. opposite Ronald Reagan in MGM’s Prisoner of War (1954), as Robert Taylor’s younger brother in Rogue Cop (1954), as Doris Day’s would-be suitor in It Happened to Jane (1959), as Elvis Presley’s half brother in the Western Flaming Star (1960), as Sophia Loren’s gun-slinging love interest in Heller in Pink Tights (1960) and with John Wayne and an all-star cast in The Longest Day (1962).

Later film and television appearances included North Dallas Forty (1979), Mommie Dearest (1981) with Faye Dunaway, Spies Like Us (1985) with Chevy Chase and Dan Aykroyd, the miniseries Hollywood Wives (1985), a season in the 1980s on TV’s Dallas, Storyville (1992) with James Spader and Killer: A Journal of Murder (1995) with James Woods.

A trained vocalist, Forrest made his Broadway debut as budding prizefighter Bob Stanton in the 1958 production of The Body Beautiful opposite Mindy Carson, Jack Warden and Brock Peters.

In 1965, Forrest relocated to London with his family to star as John Mannering, the international antique dealer-cum-secret agent in the ITC crime drama The Baron. The program, which lasted 30 episodes, was ITV's first in color using real actors for an entire season and was exported to ABC in the States.

An avid and accomplished golfer, Forrest frequently played in charity tournaments around the world. In 1976, he competed on the American team at the Bing Crosby Great Britain vs. U.S.A. Tournament at the Glen Eagles course in Scotland.

Survivors include his wife of 65 years, Christine, sons Michael, Forrest and Stephen and grandchildren Samantha, Emily, Aubrey and Alex.

A service will be held at 10 a.m. May 30 at Pierce Brothers Valley Oaks Griffin Memorial Park in Westlake Village, Calif.

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Unread postPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 4:08 pm 
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I always liked Forrest as an actor - he was one those dependable, stalwart types and you always knew what you were getting with him, a kind of comfort zone. He could be chilling if he wanted to - I remember him from at least one old Gunsmoke episode (he was in a couple, I think) in which he played this super-fast gunslinger, even much faster than Matt Dillon, and he was sort of psychotic in that one. I have his Baron series on DVD, still sealed; been saving it for a right time to open it and watch; maybe that time is here.

His older brother was film actor Dana Andrews, who died over 20 years ago.


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Unread postPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 6:36 pm 
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Maxine Stuart, Actress in Classic 'Twilight Zone' Episode, Dead at 94


Maxine Stuart, long-time stage, motion picture and daytime drama actress, has died at the age of 94 of natural causes at her Beverly Hills home.

Stuart was nominated for an Emmy for her guest star role as the Piano Teacher in the “Coda” episode of “The Wonder Years” in 1989 and a Soap Opera Digest Award for her work in “The Young and the Restless.”

But perhaps her most iconic role was in the “Twilight Zone” episode entitled, “Eye of the Beholder,” where she played a woman undergoing surgery in a futile attempt to appear “normal,” and appeared wrapped in bandages until the very end of the episode when actress Donna Douglas (still using Stuart’s voice) was revealed under the bandages.

Stuart was a life member of The Actors Studio and a member of Theatre West.

Stuart was born Maxine Shlivek on June 28, 1918 in Deal, N.J., and got her start working on the New York stage and early TV programs such as “Playhouse 90,” the “Philco-Goodyear Television Theatre” and “Robert Montgomery Presents.” She gained prominence as a regular on the New York-based soap opera, “The Edge of Night,” portraying Grace O’Keefe, public stenographer.

In the late 1950s, Stuart and then-husband, actor Frank Maxwell -- who went on to become president of AFTRA -- relocated to Los Angeles. She appeared as a guest star in several series and had regular parts in “Slattery’s People,” opposite Richard Crenna, “Executive Suite,” with Mitch Ryan and Stephen Elliott, and “Hearts Afire” with John Ritter and Markie Post, and on soap operas “The Young and the Restless” and “General Hospital.”

She also appeared in numerous motion pictures, including “The Days of Wine and Roses” with Jack Lemmon, “Private Benjamin” with Goldie Hawn, and her personal favorite, “Winning,” the film in which she shared an on-screen kiss with Paul Newman.

Stuart and Maxwell divorced in 1964 and in 1974 she married writer David Shaw, a union which lasted until Shaw’s death in 2007.

Stuart leaves behind daughters Chris Maxwell, Ellen Shaw Agress and Liz Shaw Baron, grandchildren Kate and Zak Baron, Emily and Adam Agress and great-grandson Jack Agress.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

After looking around, and seeing a few articles, this is the only one I found (in a quick search) that even mentions her TZ role which is why I included it here.
Most of the others talked about her other soap roles etc.

Woodrow Mulligan may want to chime in here, he had the pleasure of meeting her in person just a year or two back.


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Unread postPosted: Sat Aug 03, 2013 11:59 am 
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Film and television actress and producer Gail Kobe died yesterday (8/1) at the age of 82.
http://www.deadline.com/2013/08/r-i-p-gail-kobe/Image Her first major film was Cecil B. DeMille’s epic The Ten Commandments in 1956. She went on to appear in dozens of TV shows throughout her career, earning an Emmy nomination for her portrayal of Dr. Anne Warner on the 1960s TV series Dr. Kildare. Her other TV credits include soaps Peyton Place and Bright Promise. She also starred in such TV classics The Twilight Zone, The Fugitive, Bewitched, Hogan’s Heroes, The Mod Squad, Mission Impossible and The Outer Limits and appeared in over 50 Westerns, including, Rawhide, The Virginian, Maverick, Daniel Boone and Gunsmoke. She moved into producing daytime dramas during the 1970s and 80s with credits including Days of Our Lives, Texas, Another World, The Bold And The Beautiful, and Guiding Light, for which she was nominated for a Daytime Emmy Award. For the past two years, she resided at the Motion Picture Television Fund Home, where she was very active at Channel 22, organizing the show We’ve Got Mail, among other Fund activities.

TZ episodes: - The Self-Improvement of Salvadore Ross (1964) TV episode .... Leah Maitland
- In His Image (1963) TV episode .... Jessica Connelly
- A World of Difference (1960) TV episode .... Sally


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Unread postPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2013 2:12 pm 
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NO!I LOVE Gail Kobe! :cry:

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Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 8:53 pm 
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Rip Jeanne, Steve, Maxine & Gail :cry:


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Unread postPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2013 11:09 pm 
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They used photos of Cooper in a second season Psych episode to represent a murder victim's wife. Nice of Corbin to contribute those photos of her. Man Gail Kobe was a looker, no wonder she's a favorite of so many male TZ fans. She was also in a Fugitive episode, like so many other TZ guest stars.


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Unread postPosted: Sat Aug 24, 2013 6:51 pm 
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Ted Post, a veteran television and film director who directed a young Clint Eastwood on TV's "Rawhide" and later directed the film legend in the hit movies "Hang `em High" and "Magnum Force," has died. He was 95.


Post, who had been in failing health, died early Tuesday at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, said his daughter, Laurie Post.

Beginning with an episode of the TV dramatic anthology series "Danger" in 1950, Post went on to direct segments of series such as "Armstrong Circle Theatre," "Schlitz Playhouse of Stars," "Medic," "Waterfront," "Perry Mason," "The Rifleman" and "Gunsmoke."

For television in the '60s, he directed series such as "Twilight Zone," "The Defenders," "Combat!" and, most frequently, "Peyton Place," the hit continuing romantic drama that aired up to three times per week.

Post also directed more than 20 episodes of "Rawhide," the popular western series launched on CBS in 1959 starring Eric Fleming and Eastwood.

After Eastwood's big-screen successes in Italian director Sergio Leone's "spaghetti westerns," the star insisted that Post direct his 1968 western "Hang `em High."

Post went on to direct Eastwood in the 1973 film "Magnum Force," the first of the "Dirty Harry" sequels featuring Eastwood's signature San Francisco police inspector, "Dirty" Harry Callahan, first seen in the Don Siegel-directed "Dirty Harry" two years earlier.

Among Post's other film are "Beneath the Planet of the Apes" (1970), "The Harrad Experiment" (1973) and "Go Tell the Spartans" (1978). He also directed the 1976-77 TV series "Rich Man, Poor Man — Book II" and the 1986 TV-movie remake of "Stagecoach."

Born in Brooklyn on March 31, 1918, Post began thinking of a show business career while working weekends as an usher at the Loew's Pitkin Theatre in Brooklyn in the late '30s.

He studied acting in a workshop taught by a former actress with the Moscow Art Theater but soon gave up thoughts of becoming an actor and began directing at a summer stock theater on Long Island.

After serving in the Army during World War II, he resumed directing in the theater. That included directing Bela Lugosi in a 1948 production of "Dracula" at the Norwich Summer Theatre in Connecticut.

Post is survived by his wife of 72 years, Thelma; his daughter, Laurie Post, a clinical psychologist; his son, Robert Post, dean of Yale Law School; four grandchildren and his brother Joe and sister Ruth.Twilight Zone (TV series)

His Twilight Zone episodes:
– The Fear (1964)

– Mr. Garrity and the Graves (1964)

– Probe 7, Over and Out (1963)

– A World of Difference (1960) Twilight Zone (TV series)

Services are planned for 1 p.m. Friday at Mt. Sinai Memorial Park, 5950 Forest Lawn Drive, Los Angeles.

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Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 12:02 pm 
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If Maxine Stuart had made nothing but THE MAN WHO WAS NEVER BORN and EYE OF THE BEHOLDER, she'd still have made a huge mark on "genre" TV.
The same with Gail Kobe and her O.L. and T.Z. appearances.


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Unread postPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2013 2:24 pm 
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Ted Post also directed two Columbo episodes, another favorite show of mine, A Matter of Honor and A Case of Immunity.


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Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 25, 2013 9:09 am 
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I don't think anyone posted this:

http://www.mst3kinfo.com/?p=16244


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Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2013 11:51 am 
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adamgrant wrote:
I don't think anyone posted this:

http://www.mst3kinfo.com/?p=16244


I remember her, a beautiful actress. Colonel Klink was a lucky dude! RIP

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Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:37 pm 
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Unread postPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 9:34 pm 
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Sarah Marshall, an actress who was born into show business and worked on Broadway, in film and on television, perhaps most memorably in episodes of “The Twilight Zone” and “Star Trek,” died on Jan. 18 at her home in Los Angeles. She was 80.

The cause was stomach cancer, said her grandson, Seamus Marshall Bourne.

Ms. Marshall was the only daughter of the British film and theater stars Herbert Marshall and Edna Best. She left private school at 16 to pursue acting full time, with her mother’s help.

“We decided acting was a better education than school,” she was quoted as saying in Sidney Fields’s syndicated column “Only Human” in 1958. She was often cast as an ingénue.

Ms. Marshall performed opposite José Ferrer in the 1953 Broadway revival of the cross-dressing farce “Charley’s Aunt” and won a Theater World Award for her work in the 1956 play “The Ponder Heart,” based on a Eudora Welty story.

She was nominated for a Tony for her performance in George Axelrod’s 1959 comedy “Goodbye, Charlie,” which also starred Lauren Bacall and Sydney Chaplin.
“There is a little gem of malicious acting by Sarah Marshall, whose honeyed style is spiked with vinegar,” Brooks Atkinson wrote in his review of that play in The New York Times.

Ms. Marshall’s first film was “The Long, Hot Summer” (1958), with Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward. She appeared with Kevin Kline and Sigourney Weaver in Ivan Reitman’s political comedy “Dave” (1993) and with Michelle Pfeiffer in “Dangerous Minds” (1995).

She was a mainstay on television, appearing on shows from “Alfred Hitchcock Presents” to “Cheers.” In 1962 she played a woman whose daughter vanishes into the fourth dimension in the “Twilight Zone” episode “Little Girl Lost,” and in 1967 she played a former love interest of William Shatner’s Capt. James T. Kirk in the “Star Trek” episode “The Deadly Years.”

Ms. Marshall was born in London on May 25, 1933. After her parents divorced in 1939, she and her mother moved to Los Angeles. In 1952 she married the set designer Melvyn Bourne. The marriage ended in divorce.

In 1958 she met the actor Karl Held while performing in “The World of Suzie Wong” on Broadway. They were married in 1964. He survives her, as do a son from her first marriage, Timothy M. Bourne, and four grandchildren.

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Unread postPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:54 pm 
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She was a real looker back in the day too. I should be getting to her Thriller episode soon on my DVD set. So she really was British? So then her Americanized accent on TZ wasn't the real one, I thought she was putting on a British accent on Thriller, guess not. Damn good actress IMO.


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Unread postPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 1:41 am 
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Whoa - Sarah Marshall; didn't realize she passed away until I noticed this thread just now. I'm most familiar with her role in that Star Trek episode, The Deadly Years, in which she had to act mostly opposite Shatner as Kirk when he had aged to 70 or 80 years old. It must have been a little strange for her, being one of his girlfriends on the show. But, I just saw her in that TZ episode - Little Girl Lost - during the last New Years marathon. R.I.P.


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Unread postPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 9:29 am 
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Goonight Ms. Marshall.

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Unread postPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 6:17 pm 
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:cry: RIP Sarah Marshall, you will be sorely missed. :cry:

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Unread postPosted: Sun May 11, 2014 4:55 pm 
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Nancy Malone was on the cover of Life magazine at age 11, had a starring role on Broadway at 17 and worked steadily as an actress in television in her 20s and 30s.

Though she was in demand, she feared for the future. "I'd seen actresses getting to the age of 45, having nowhere to go except Bloomingdale's or regional theater," Malone said in an interview for the 2002 book "Women Who Run the Show."

I just can't wrap my mouth around 'How-do-you-want-your-coffee-darling?'
- Nancy Malone, on the TV roles offered to women in the 1960s
She drastically curbed her acting in the 1970s for the other side of the camera. Malone became not only an Emmy-winning producer and studio executive, but also — in a move highly unusual for a woman at the time — a director, working on shows such as "Dynasty," "Cagney & Lacey" and "Star Trek: Voyager."

Malone, 79, died Thursday at City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte. The cause was pneumonia that arose from complications of leukemia, said publicist Harlan Boll.

Although Malone credits several men with helping her make the transitions in her career, she also keenly felt the prejudice against women. In the mid-1970s, Malone was made a vice president for television at 20th Century Fox, but not on a level playing field.
"The guys made more money than me, and I was doing the same job," she said in a 2010 interview recorded by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. In her early years as a producer, some directors and crew members would hardly talk to her.

It led her to become a founding member of the Women In Film support and networking group in 1973.

"It is very hard to grasp now, but there was absolutely no place for women to meet to talk about our ambitions or about improving our working lives," she said in "Women Who Run the Show," written by Mollie Gregory.

"The guys were helping each other," Malone continued. "We all saw how the guys went into the men's room and came out with a deal. How do we find a way to move up without using the men's room?"

She was born Ann Maloney on March 19, 1935, in Queens Village on Long Island in New York. When she was in grade school, photos of her taken as a lark (it was supposed to be her brother's photo session) led to her being signed by a prominent modeling agency. With her hair in pigtails, she was the cover girl on the 10th anniversary issue of Life in 1946. As she got radio work, an agent suggested she change her name.


Taking acting seriously as a teenager, Malone studied at the famed Actors Studio. In 1952 she had the title role in the Broadway comedy "Time Out for Ginger." In addition to theater, she got work in early television, sometimes simultaneously. At one point she was on the live soap opera "The Guiding Light," filming scenes for her costarring role in the TV series "The Naked City" and appearing in a play, all in the same day.

Malone moved to Los Angeles in 1965 and the work continued to pour in, with roles on "The Fugitive," "The Andy Griffith Show," "Hawaii Five-O" and other hits. She was disappointed, however, in many of the roles offered women. "I just can't wrap my mouth around 'How-do-you-want-your-coffee-darling?' once more," she told TV executive Tom Moore in 1970, as reported in the Gregory book. He was forming an independent company and offered her a job.

She eventually made the leap, learning the producing end of the business. The first TV film she produced was 1975's "Winner Take All" with Shirley Jones, about a woman with a gambling addiction. It was a ratings hit on NBC, leading to the job at Fox where she stayed for three years. Back on her own, she produced the 1978 TV movie about divorce, "Like Mom, Like Me," starring Linda Lavin, and other films.

After a bad experience with a director, she sought to learn that side of the business. She studied serious films — "I knew every shot in every Bergman film," she said in the Academy interview — and made a short at the American Film Institute. She and her close friend Linda Hope, daughter of Bob Hope, raised the money to make a low-budget drama about Alzheimer's disease: "Those Were Times, Dear." It aired on PBS in 1985, and that led to Malone getting a TV director's prize: an episode of "Dynasty."

She directed 15 more episodes of that show and worked as a director into the mid-2000s. Malone returned to producing for the 1993 TV special "Bob Hope: The First 90 Years," for which she won an Emmy.

Actress Tyne Daly, who was directed by Malone in "Cagney & Lacey," said she always kept things light. "She brought the most energetic and enthusiastic spirit to the set and managed to keep it through all of the long, long days," Daly said in a statement. But the lightness in tone didn't mean Malone wasn't serious about the work.

"She was a true believer," Daly said, "but she was nobody's fool."

Malone has no immediate survivors.

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Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2014 7:23 pm 
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We'd reported earlier the possible death of Terry Burnham, which has finally, and sadly, been confirmed. Terry Burnham passed away on October 7, 2013 at the age of 64 in Long Beach, California, where she spent almost her entire life. She was one of the great child actresses of her era, and had the distinction of starring in the early episode "Nightmare as a Child" on TZ. She will remain alive through her global-spanning fans, who respect and appreciate her work in TV and film. Rest in eternal comfort.

http://www.serialscoop.com/2014/07/bob-hastings-dead-at-89.html

Bob Hastings Dead at 89

Actor Bob Hastings died on June 30. He was 89.

Hastings got his show business start in radio after WWII as the voice of Archie Andrews in the show of the same name (a spin-off of the Archie Comics series) on the Mutual Broadcasting System. Hastings made the transition to television smoothly in 1949 in early galactic-action series like Captain Video and His Video Rangers and Atom Squad. His first recurring role was as a lieutenant on The Phil Silvers Show.

Most of his career has been spent in television, and he's notable for roles such as Captain Binghamton's yes-man Lieutenant Elroy Carpenter on McHale's Navy, one of the two Tommy Kelsey's on All in the Family, and Captain Burt Ramsey on General Hospital (1979-1986).

Among his other television roles was Barney in The Edge of Night and Ed Foyle in Kitty Foyle.

Hastings has also done much voice work, including playing The Raven on The Munsters, Superboy on the The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure cartoons in the 1960s and, in recent years, the voice of Commissioner Gordon on the animated Batman: The Animated Series cartoons.

Bob Hastings was the older brother of longtime As the World Turns star Don Hastings.

He is also survived by his wife, Joan, and four children.



http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-paul-mazursky-20140701-story.html

Paul Mazursky, a five-time Oscar nominee who wrote and directed humorously compassionate films about male-female relationships, including “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice,” “Blume in Love” and “An Unmarried Woman,” has died. He was 84.

Mazursky died of pulmonary cardiac arrest Monday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, according to family spokeswoman Nancy Willen.

Mazursky earned a place in the top ranks of Hollywood writer-directors for his gently satiric examinations of infidelity, wife-swapping, drug experimentation and other social trends of the late 1960s and the 1970s.

He wrote and directed most of his 17 films, including “Harry and Tonto” (1974), which brought Art Carney a best actor Oscar for his portrayal of a dejected retiree.

“I seem to have a natural bent toward humor and I seem to make people laugh,” Mazursky once told the Chicago Tribune, “but I think there is in me a duality. I like to make people cry also. … I like to deal with relationships. The perfect picture for me does all that.”

The filmmaker, who has been compared to Woody Allen and Ingmar Bergman, received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2013.


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Unread postPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2014 3:24 am 
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Day late and a dollar short with Terry Burnham. The news of her death should've been posted here.


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Unread postPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2014 3:46 am 
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Major wrote:
Day late and a dollar short with Terry Burnham. The news of her death should've been posted here.


We discussed it a bit back in the "Nightmare as a Child" thread.
Well before the "proof" that Andrew received just recently this last time.


The fact that there still isn't much concrete proof of her death is odd, as I mentioned to Andrew in email a week or so back.

But one thing is for certain, if the death record and list of old addresses that I saw that were forwarded to me were indeed "real addresses that she was living at , at one point", then I can say for absolute certain I sent her TTM requests at 2 of those addresses.
Andrew would have no way of knowing the exact addys I sent to (though I may have given him 1-2 years back when several of us were searching) but two of them stood out immediately when I went through the list.
So I know for sure I reached her, but she opted not to sign, and just to stay out of the limelight.

Pretty sad really.
Both Andrew and I believe there may have been some mental issues involved, which most likely happened after a rumored serious car accident she was involved in, sometime in the early 1980's.


More on this here. ---> viewtopic.php?f=21&t=67



Good to see you back on the board Major.



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Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2014 6:57 pm 
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Richard "Kanamit" Kiel Dies at 74

http://variety.com/2014/film/news/james ... 201303251/

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Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2014 7:12 pm 
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Rip Richard.

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Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2014 11:23 pm 
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I saw him this week in the first episode of The Man From Uncle, "The Vulcan Affair," on METV.

He appeared only for a second or two and fought against Solo in the nuclear plant.

Richard Kiel served man.


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Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 12, 2014 6:01 pm 
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No way! Good night Mr. Kiel.

RIP

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Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2014 1:07 pm 
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What was cause of death? I thought Kiel was doing good.


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Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2014 7:38 pm 
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StillValleyBard wrote:
What was cause of death? I thought Kiel was doing good.


Unknown causes according to all reports. He had broken his leg earlier in the week. It could have had undiagnosed complications but I'm purely speculating.


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Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 2:41 pm 
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I don't have time to expand on it, but its been reported that Don Keefer passed away early last month.

At the time, he was the oldest living TZ alum, I believe.









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Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 3:26 pm 
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TZ DZ Fan wrote:
I don't have time to expand on it, but its been reported that Don Keefer passed away early last month.

At the time, he was the oldest living TZ alum, I believe.



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Ah man, no way. Sad to hear. Good night, Mr. Keefer. Enjoy some Perry Como.


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Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2014 6:06 am 
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Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2014 8:52 am 
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And I heard the Peach Wine is not that bad,either. Rest in Peace. :cry:

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 6:31 pm 
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http://www.aol.com/article/2015/01/02/d ... d%3D592444

Another TZ alum departs to the great unknown. Donna Douglas has passed away from pancreatic cancer. Good night, Ms. Douglas.

RIP

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Unread postPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2015 6:44 am 
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RIP Donna


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Unread postPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2015 11:10 am 
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:cry: I heard the nurses and doctors tried! RIP Ms. Douglas :cry:

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Unread postPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2015 12:27 pm 
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Eerily enough.....I fell asleep the night before to Eye of the Beholder during the TZ marathon. Enjoy the village Ms. Douglas.

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Unread postPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 8:07 pm 
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:cry: Actor Rod Taylor dead.... :cry:

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 7:28 pm 
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Beware The Creeper wrote:
:cry: Actor Rod Taylor dead.... :cry:

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No way! I always hate hearing about these things, even though they're inevitable. Col. Forbes has been yanked out into the great void, may he find the X-20.

Goodnight Mr. Taylor. RIP

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 8:58 pm 
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:roll: Fellow co-stars have flown in from all over to express their condolences :(

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 11:00 pm 
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Terry Becker RIP

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Unread postPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2015 5:43 pm 
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I'm coming to this thread late this time around. As sad as the other recent ones are, with Rod Taylor it's the worst entertainment news I've had in a very long while. I've always been a huge fan of his.


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Unread postPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2015 4:30 pm 
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Beware The Creeper wrote:
Terry Becker RIP

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Goodnight Mr. Becker. RIP

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