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Unread postPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2009 10:21 pm 
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Collin Wilcox 1935-2009 (Marilyn Cuberle in "Number 12 Looks Just Like You") :cry:

Collin Wilcox, a ubiquitous actress whose face was familiar to television viewers in the 1960s and afterward for her guest appearances on shows like “The Untouchables,” “The Twilight Zone,” “The Defenders” and “Gunsmoke,” died on Oct. 14 at her home in Highlands, N.C. She was 74.
The cause was brain cancer, her husband, Scott Paxton, said.

A fresh-faced Southerner, Ms. Wilcox was also billed over the years as Collin Wilcox-Horne and Collin Wilcox-Paxton. Besides working actively in television, she appeared in Hollywood films and several Broadway plays.

Her best-known film role was as Mayella Ewell, the young white woman who falsely accuses a black man (played by Brock Peters) of rape in “To Kill a Mockingbird,” the 1962 adaptation of Harper Lee’s novel. Ms. Wilcox’s tearful testimony on the witness stand as Gregory Peck’s Atticus Finch cross-examines her is widely considered one of the movie’s most memorable scenes.

Ms. Wilcox made her Broadway debut in 1958 in “The Day the Money Stopped,” a drama by Maxwell Anderson and Brendan Gill. Though the play closed after four performances, she won the Clarence Derwent Award from the Actors’ Equity Association as the year’s most promising female performer.

Collin Wilcox was born on Feb. 4, 1935, in Cincinnati and moved with her family to Highlands as a baby. In the late 1930s her parents helped found a local theater company, the Highlands Community Theater, where she got her first stage experience.

Ms. Wilcox studied at the University of Tennessee, what was then the Goodman School of Drama in Chicago and the Actors Studio in New York. In Chicago she performed with the Compass Players, an improvisational group that was a forerunner of the Second City theater troupe.

On television Ms. Wilcox came to wide attention in 1958, when she starred in a live television production of “The Member of the Wedding.” (An adaptation of Carson McCullers’s novel, it was directed by Robert Mulligan, who later directed “To Kill a Mockingbird.”) To land the role of Frankie, the story’s preadolescent heroine, Ms. Wilcox, then in her early 20s, appeared at the audition with her hair shorn, her breasts bound with dishtowels and her face dotted with “freckles” of iodine.

Ms. Wilcox’s first marriage, to Walter Beakel, ended in divorce, as did her second, to Geoffrey Horne. She is survived by her third husband, Mr. Paxton, whom she married in 1979; three children, Kimberly Horne, Michael G. Paxton and William Horne; and three grandchildren.

Her other television appearances include guest roles on “Dr. Kildare,” “The Fugitive,” “Ironside,” “The Waltons” and “Little House on the Prairie.”

Among Ms. Wilcox’s other films are “Catch-22” (1970), “Jaws 2” (1978), “Marie” (1985) and the TV movie “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman,” broadcast on CBS in 1974.


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Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 10:12 pm 
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Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2009 7:05 pm 
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Joe Maross 1923-2009

Actor Joe Maross, whose career spanned four decades starting with early live TV, died Nov. 7. He was 86.
Born in Barnsboro, Penn. he served in the Marines and then graduated in theater arts from Yale.

Maross started out in the early days of TV on "Lux Video Theater" in 1952, followed by roles in shows including "Philco Playhouse," "Kraft Television Theater," "The United States Steel Hour" and "Studio One."

Moving to Hollywood, he appeared in TV shows such as "The Twilight Zone," "Bonanza," "Alfred Hitchcock Presents," " "The Outer Limits." Other TV series in which he appeared include "The Fugitive," "Gunsmoke," "Hawaii Five O." "Mission Impossible," "Perry Mason," "Mannix," "The Rockford Files," "Charlies Angels," "Quincy," "Dallas" and "Murder She Wrote."

He also appeared in feature films including "Run Silent Run Deep," "Elmer Gantry," "Sometimes a Great Notion" and "The Salzburg Connection."

He was a founding member of the Los Angeles based acting, writing and directing group "Projects 58" as well as a voting member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Maross is survived by a son.


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Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2009 7:29 pm 
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Unread postPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:23 am 
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MUMY, Muriel Gertrude July 19, 1912 - January 29, 2010 Loving wife to Charles. Mother to Bill. Mother-in-Law to Eileen. Grandmother to Seth and Liliana.

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The link also includes an option to offer condolences in the guest book.


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Unread postPosted: Sat May 29, 2010 7:07 pm 
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Dennis Hopper dies........................

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LOS ANGELES -- Dennis Hopper, the high-flying Hollywood wild man whose memorable and erratic career included an early turn in "Rebel Without a Cause," an improbable smash with "Easy Rider" and a classic character role in "Blue Velvet," has died. He was 74.

Hopper died Saturday at his home in the Los Angeles beach community of Venice, surrounded by family and friends, family friend Alex Hitz said. Hopper's manager announced in October 2009 that he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer.

The success of "Easy Rider," and the spectacular failure of his next film, "The Last Movie," fit the pattern for the talented but sometimes uncontrollable actor-director, who also had parts in such favorites as "Apocalypse Now" and "Hoosiers." He was a two-time Academy Award nominee, and in March 2010, was honored with a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame.

After a promising start that included roles in two James Dean films, Hopper's acting career had languished as he developed a reputation for throwing tantrums and abusing alcohol and drugs. On the set of "True Grit," Hopper so angered John Wayne that the star reportedly chased Hopper with a loaded gun.

Tributes were posted Saturday on celebrities' websites and Twitter feeds.

Actress Marlee Matlin called Hopper a "maverick, a wonderful actor. You always got something unexpected from him."

Guitarist Slash tweeted, "You take the great ones for granted until they're gone. RIP Dennis Hopper."

He married five times and led a dramatic life right to the end. In January 2010, Hopper filed to end his 14-year marriage to Victoria Hopper, who stated in court filings that the actor was seeking to cut her out of her inheritance, a claim Hopper denied.

"Much of Hollywood," wrote critic-historian David Thomson, "found Hopper a pain in the neck."

All was forgiven, at least for a moment, when he collaborated with another struggling actor, Peter Fonda, on a script about two pot-smoking, drug-dealing hippies on a motorcycle trip through the Southwest and South to take in the New Orleans Mardi Gras.

On the way, Hopper and Fonda befriend a drunken young lawyer (Jack Nicholson, whom Hopper had resisted casting, in a breakout role), but arouse the enmity of Southern rednecks and are murdered before they can return home.

"'Easy Rider' was never a motorcycle movie to me," Hopper said in 2009. "A lot of it was about politically what was going on in the country."

Fonda produced "Easy Rider" and Hopper directed it for a meager $380,000. It went on to gross $40 million worldwide, a substantial sum for its time. The film caught on despite tension between Hopper and Fonda and between Hopper and the original choice for Nicholson's part, Rip Torn, who quit after a bitter argument with the director.

The film was a hit at Cannes, netted a best-screenplay Oscar nomination for Hopper, Fonda and Terry Southern, and has since been listed on the American Film Institute's ranking of the top 100 American films. The establishment gave official blessing in 1998 when "Easy Rider" was included in the United States National Film Registry for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

Its success prompted studio heads to schedule a new kind of movie: low cost, with inventive photography and themes about a young, restive baby boom generation. With Hopper hailed as a brilliant filmmaker, Universal Pictures lavished $850,000 on his next project, "The Last Movie."

The title was prescient. Hopper took a large cast and crew to a village in Peru to film the tale of a Peruvian tribe corrupted by a movie company. Trouble on the set developed almost immediately, as Peruvian authorities pestered the company, drug-induced orgies were reported and Hopper seemed out of control.
When he finally completed filming, he retired to his home in Taos, N.M., to piece together the film, a process that took almost a year, in part because he was using psychedelic drugs for editing inspiration.

When it was released, "The Last Movie" was such a crashing failure that it made Hopper unwanted in Hollywood for a decade. At the same time, his drug and alcohol use was increasing to the point where he was said to be consuming as much as a gallon of rum a day.

Shunned by the Hollywood studios, he found work in European films that were rarely seen in the United States. But, again, he made a remarkable comeback, starting with a memorable performance as a drugged-out journalist in Francis Ford Coppola's 1979 Vietnam War epic, "Apocalypse Now," a spectacularly long and troubled film to shoot. Hopper was drugged-out off camera, too, and his rambling chatter was worked into the final cut.

He went on to appear in several films in the early 1980s, including the well regarded "Rumblefish" and "The Osterman Weekend," as well as the campy "My Science Project" and "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2."

But alcohol and drugs continued to interfere with his work. Treatment at a detox clinic helped him stop drinking but he still used cocaine, and at one point he became so hallucinatory that he was committed to the psychiatric ward of a Los Angeles hospital.

Upon his release, Hopper joined Alcoholics Anonymous, quit drugs and launched yet another comeback. It began in 1986 when he played an alcoholic ex-basketball star in "Hoosiers," which brought him an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor.

His role as a wild druggie in "Blue Velvet," also in 1986, won him more acclaim, and years later the character wound up No. 36 on the AFI's list of top 50 movie villains.

He returned to directing, with "Colors," "The Hot Spot" and "Chasers."

"So long Dennis," tweeted actress Virginia Madsen, who starred in "The Hot Spot." "U taught me so much."

From that point on, Hopper maintained a frantic work pace, appearing in many forgettable movies and a few memorable ones, including 1993's "True Romance," where he played a well-meaning ex-cop trying to protect his son from a gangster played by Christopher Walken.

"No better scene in the movies than his showdown with Walken in 'True Romance'," actress Elizabeth Banks tweeted Saturday. "A cinematic Ali v. Frazier."

Hopper made it to the top of the box office in the 1994 hit "Speed," in which he played the maniacal plotter of a freeway disaster. In the 2000s, he was featured in the television series "Crash" and such films as "Elegy" and "Hell Ride."

Jocko Sims, who starred opposite Hopper in "Crash," called him a "legend."

"What he did for me was to give me the confidence to feel like I was doing it right," said Sims, 29. "He wouldn't hold back with his positive re-enforcement. And what else would you need as an actor but to be validated by Dennis Hopper!"

"Work is fun to me," he told a reporter in 1991. "All those years of being an actor and a director and not being able to get a job -- two weeks is too long to not know what my next job will be."

For years he lived in Los Angeles' bohemian beach community of Venice, in a house designed by acclaimed architect Frank Gehry.

In later years he picked up some income by becoming a pitchman for Ameriprise Financial, aiming ads at baby boomers looking ahead to retirement. His politics, like much of his life, were unpredictable. The old rebel contributed money to the Republican Party in recent years, but also voted for Democrat Barack Obama in 2008.

Hopper also tried his hand at a number of artistic pursuits including photography, sculpting and painting. His art, dating to a 1955 painting, is the subject of a show opening July 11 at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Geffen Contemporary space in downtown Los Angeles. The title of the exhibition, "Double Standard," is taken from a 1961 Hopper photograph of two Standard Oil signs seen through an automobile windshield on historic Route 66 in Los Angeles.

Dennis Lee Hopper was born in 1936, in Dodge City, Kan., and spent much of his youth on the nearby farm of his grandparents. He saw his first movie at 5 and became enthralled.

After moving to San Diego with his family, he played Shakespeare at the Old Globe Theater.

Scouted by the studios, Hopper was under contract to Columbia until he insulted the boss, Harry Cohn. From there he went to Warner Bros., where he made "Rebel Without a Cause" and "Giant" while in his late teens.

Later, he moved to New York to study at the Actors Studio, where Dean had learned his craft.

Hopper's first wife was Brooke Hayward, the daughter of actress Margaret Sullavan and agent Leland Hayward, and author of the best-selling memoir "Haywire." They had a daughter, Marin, before Hopper's drug-induced violence led to divorce after eight years.

His second marriage, to singer-actress Michelle Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas, lasted only eight days.

A union with actress Daria Halprin also ended in divorce after they had a daughter, Ruthana. Hopper and his fourth wife, dancer Katherine LaNasa, had a son, Henry, before divorcing.

He married his fifth wife, Victoria Duffy, who was 32 years his junior, in 1996, and they had a daughter, Galen Grier.

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Unread postPosted: Sun May 30, 2010 8:15 am 
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Unread postPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 10:50 pm 
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Interview magazine did Hopper's last interview, I think it's a two parter, kind of interesting stuff, talks about how he got started in the business and his experiences as an actor, working with people like Natalie Wood, James Dean and Rod Serling.


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Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 6:26 pm 
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Edson Stroll died of cancer on July 18, 2011 at age 82. Stroll is survived by Anita Winters, and a private scattering of his ashes was planned.[
Stroll began his career as a bodybuilder in the 1950s. He then moved to acting in 1958 with bit parts on television shows such as How to Marry a Millionaire, Sea Hunt and The Twilight Zone ( of course he did 2 episodes, "Eye of the Beholder" and "The Trade-Ins"). He then landed a steady role on McHale's Navy as Virgil Edwards.

Fans of slapstick comedy team The Three Stooges remember Stroll for his roles in two 1960s-era feature films, Snow White and the Three Stooges and The Three Stooges in Orbit.[1]

Throughout the 2000s, Stroll has provided voice-overs, and occasionally appeared at Hollywood autograph signing shows, near his Marina del Rey home in Southern California.

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Unread postPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 10:27 am 
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Unread postPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2011 10:47 am 
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:cry: Why do we have to be like this? :cry:

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Unread postPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2011 10:44 pm 
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Very sadly, another one of the TZ greats has left us. Oddly enough, DrM and I just talked about him the other night on the phone.

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Cliff Robertson, who played JFK in 'PT-109,' dies


NEW YORK — President John F. Kennedy had just one critique when he saw photos of the actor set to play him in a World War II drama.

The year was 1963 and actor Cliff Robertson looked convincing in his costume for "PT-109," the first film to portray a sitting president. Kennedy had favored Robertson for the role, but one detail was off.

Robertson's hair was parted on the wrong side.

The actor dutifully trained his locks to part on the left and won praise for a role he'd remain proud of throughout his life.

Robertson, who went on to win an Oscar for his portrayal of a mentally disabled man in "Charly", died of natural causes Saturday afternoon in Stony Brook, a day after his 88th birthday, according to Evelyn Christel, his secretary of 53 years.

Robertson never elevated into the top ranks of leading men, but he remained a popular actor from the mid-1950s into the following century. His later roles included kindly Uncle Ben in the "Spider-Man" movies.

He also gained attention for his second marriage to actress and heiress Dina Merrill, daughter of financier E.F. Hutton and Marjorie Merriweather Post, heiress to the Post cereal fortune and one of the world's richest women.

His triumph came in 1968 with his Academy Award performance in "Charly," as a mentally disabled man who undergoes medical treatment that makes him a genius — until a poignant regression to his former state.

"My father was a loving father, devoted friend, dedicated professional and honorable man," daughter Stephanie Saunders said in a statement. "He stood by his family, friends, and colleagues through good times and bad. He made a difference in all our lives and made our world a better place. We will all miss him terribly."

Robertson had created a string of impressive performances in television and on Broadway, but always saw his role played in films by bigger names. His TV performances in "Days of Wine and Roses" and "The Hustler," for example, were filmed with Jack Lemmon and Paul Newman, respectively. Robertson's role in Tennessee Williams' play "Orpheus Descending" was awarded to Marlon Brando in the movie.

Robertson first appeared in the "Charly" story in a TV version, "The Two Worlds of Charlie Gordon." Both were based on "Flowers for Algernon," a short story that author Daniel Keyes later revised into a novel. Robertson was determined that this time the big-screen role would not go to another actor.

"I bought the movie rights to the show, and I tried for eight years to persuade a studio to make it," he said in 1968. "Finally I found a new company, ABC Films. I owned 50 percent of the gross, but I gave half of it to Ralph Nelson to direct."

Critic Roger Ebert called Robertson's portrayal "a sensitive, believable one." The motion picture academy agreed, though Robertson was unable to get a break from an overseas movie shoot and was not on hand when his Oscar was announced.

Portraying Kennedy in "PT-109," presented other challenges. The president warned Robertson he didn't want someone trying to imitate his distinctive New England accent.

"That was fine with me," the actor commented in 1963. "I think it would have been a mistake for me to say `Hahvahd' or try to reproduce gestures. Then the audience would have been constantly aware that an actor was impersonating the president."

He added that the film obviously couldn't be done with heroics, "like Errol Flynn gunning down 30 of the enemy. This young naval officer just does things because they have to be done."

"PT-109" was plagued with problems from the start: script changes, switch of directors, bad weather, snakes and mosquitoes in the Florida Keys where it was filmed.

The troubles were evident on the screen, and critics roundly rapped the film, although Robertson's work won praise.

In 1977, Robertson made the headlines again, this time by blowing the whistle on a Hollywood financial scandal.

He had discovered that David Begelman, president of Columbia Pictures, had forged his signature on a $10,000 salary check, and he called the FBI and the Burbank and Beverly Hills police departments. Hollywood insiders were not happy with the ugly publicity.

"I got phone calls from powerful people who said, `You've been very fortunate in this business; I'm sure you wouldn't want all this to come to an end,'" Robertson recalled in 1984.

Begelman served time for embezzlement, but he returned to the film business. He committed suicide in 1995.

Robertson said neither the studios nor the networks would hire him for four years.

He supported himself as a spokesman for AT&T until the drought ended in 1981 when he was hired by MGM for "Brainstorm," Natalie Wood's final film.

Born Sept. 9, 1923, in La Jolla, Calif., Robertson was 2 when he was adopted by wealthy parents who named him Clifford Parker Robertson III. After his parents divorced and his mother died, he was reared by his maternal grandmother, whom he adored.

Robertson studied briefly at Antioch College, majoring in journalism, then returned to California and appeared in two small roles in Hollywood movies. Rejected by the services in World War II because of a weak eye, he served in the Merchant Marine.

He set his sights on New York theater, and like dozens of other future stars, profited from the advent of live television drama. His Broadway roles also attracted notice, and after avoiding Hollywood offers for several years, he accepted a contract at Columbia Pictures.

"I think I held the record for the number of times I was on suspension," he remarked in 1969. "I remember once I turned down a B picture, telling the boss, Harry Cohn, I would rather take a suspension. He shouted at me, `Kid, ya got more guts than brains.' I think old Harry might have been right."

Robertson's first performance for Columbia, "Picnic," was impressive, even though his screen pal, William Holden, stole the girl, Kim Novak. He followed with a tearjerker, "Autumn Leaves," as Joan Crawford's young husband, then a musical, "The Girl Most Likely" with Jane Powell. In 1959, he endeared himself to "Gidget" fans as The Big Kahuna, the mature Malibu surf bum who takes Gidget under his wing.

He remained a busy, versatile leading man through the `60s and `70s, but lacked the intensity of Brando, James Dean and others who brought a new style of acting to the screen.

"I'm not one of the Golden Six," he commented in 1967, referring to the top male stars of that day. "I take what's left over."

"They all know me as a great utility player. `Good old Cliff,' they say. Someday I'd like to be in there as the starting pitcher."

The chance came with "Charly," but after the usual Oscar flurry, he resumed his utility position.

Robertson had the most success in war movies. His strong presence made him ideal for such films as "The Naked and the Dead," "Battle of Coral Sea," "633 Squadron," "Up From the Beach," "The Devil's Brigade," "Too Late the Hero" and "Midway."

He had a passion for flying, and he poured his movie earnings into buying and restoring World War I and II planes. He even entered balloon races, including one in 1964 from the mainland to Catalina Island that ended with him being rescued from the Pacific Ocean.

In 1957, Robertson married Lemmon's ex-wife, Cynthia Stone, and they had a daughter, Stephanie, before splitting in 1960. In 1966, he married Merrill and they had a daughter, Heather. The couple divorced in 1989.

Robertson's funeral is set for Friday in East Hampton.

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Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 11, 2011 8:20 am 
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Oh no, Cliff!! He's one of my favorites I guess because of the impression left when I was a kid watching the TZ episodes he starred in.

And holy shite!! He died in Stony Brook!! I work in Stony Brook village -- I had no f@%king idea he lived in my neck of the woods. That would've been something to meet the gentleman.

Good night Mr. Robertson, you will be dearly missed.

RIP

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Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 11, 2011 8:52 am 
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lazyboyx51 wrote:
Oh no, Cliff!! He's one of my favorites I guess because of the impression left when I was a kid watching the TZ episodes he starred in.

And holy shite!! He died in Stony Brook!! I work in Stony Brook village -- I had no f@%king idea he lived in my neck of the woods. That would've been something to meet the gentleman.

Good night Mr. Robertson, you will be dearly missed.

RIP



I don't think he actually lived there, as far as I can remember.
I am betting once he started slowing down, he moved in with someone he knew there to help take care of him.

I had a physical address somewhere around here, but its in a list somewhere I'm sure.


One cool little anecdote on him.
He was a genuine nice guy. Once in a radio interview (this was even in later years, like the 1990s) he was discussing fans, what everything in TV meant to him etc, and he made the "mistake" of giving out his actual address so his fans could write him.

This is practically unheard of in todays world, to give out your real address so people know where you live..... and how to write to you.

Obviously, he did it on purpose, because he enjoyed his fans and mail. :dance:

From vague memory, this interview was aired later on a few times, (on the web too) and the address was censored out.
He will be missed.

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Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 11, 2011 10:54 pm 
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RIP Mr. Robertson.


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Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2011 8:54 am 
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Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo. This sucks, RIP.


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Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2011 2:00 pm 
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Cliff Robertson as Hugh Hefner in Star 80

Hey ladies wanna get naked? We'll pay ya. :evil:

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 Post subject: Patricia Breslin
Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 9:32 am 
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Patricia Breslin Modell

Actress gave up career upon wedding NFL team owner

Patricia Breslin Modell, 80, an actress who gave up her career when she married former NFL team owner Art Modell in 1969, died Wednesday in Baltimore, where she had been hospitalized for several months, the Baltimore Ravens announced. She had pancreatitis.

During a 22-year acting career as Patricia Breslin, she performed in theater, movies and television. She starred in the "People's Choice" television sitcom with actor Jackie Cooper in the late 1950s and played nurse Meg Baldwin in the daytime drama "General Hospital" and Laura Brooks on the prime-time soap opera "Peyton Place."

In the 1950s and '60s she made dozens of TV appearances on "Twilight Zone," "Alfred Hitchcock Presents," "Perry Mason," "Maverick" and many anthology programs.

She had a handful of movie parts, highlighted by her starring role in the 1961 suspense film "Homicidal."

In 1969, she married Art Modell, former owner and president of the Cleveland Browns and Baltimore Ravens. He adopted her two sons from her first marriage to actor John McDearmon, which ended in divorce.

She retired from acting and immersed herself in her family and community improvement. She was active in many philanthropic efforts in Cleveland and Baltimore.

Born March 17, 1931, in New York City, she was the daughter of Edward and Marjorie Breslin. Her father was a special sessions judge in New York. After attending the College of New Rochelle, she began acting in summer stock productions before moving to Hollywood.

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Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 9:33 am 
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We have a photo signed by her somewhere don't we TZ?

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Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 11:54 am 
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Rest in Peace Patricia Breslin Modell :cry:

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Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 1:51 pm 
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Woodrow Mulligan wrote:
We have a photo signed by her somewhere don't we TZ?



I know I have one that I got right when I first started collecting.

But honestly I don't think I have multiples / or more than one. Andrew had one signed by William Shatner, and Breslin from of course "Nick of Time".
Seeing as I have never gotten anything signed by Shatner, and I most likely never will, that is one I can't duplicate.

I wanted to get Shatner or Nimoy on my Outer Limits "mini" but that doesn't look like its going to happen either. That thing is damn near filled anyway, and is starting to look odd with all the signatures bunched on it. :dance:

Nimoy just announced he has done his final Trek Convention, (which I believe is the 50th anniversary) so he is pretty much done.
Shatner is almost impossible to get now, unless you nail him at a rare convention also.

Speaking of that, where in the Hell you been Woodrow?? Haven't seen you around here much.....

I will find out in the next 2 weeks if I will have to have surgery on my right shoulder, and if thats the case, I may* try and get a small TTM burst going. I simply won't be able to do the other running around I typically do.

I need to look through my stuff and figure out if I "owe" you anything, although I believe I sent most or all of it your way a couple of years ago.
Still waiting on an envelope from you though............ :D

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Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 2:49 pm 
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RIP Patricia :cry:


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Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 4:26 pm 
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Good night Ms. Breslin.

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 Post subject: Phyllis Love
Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2011 1:01 am 
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Phyllis Love, 85, a stage, movie and television actress whose roles included Rosa Delle Rose in the 1951 Broadway production of Tennessee Williams' "The Rose Tattoo" and Mattie Birdwell in the 1956 Gary Cooper film "Friendly Persuasion," died Sunday at her home in Menifee, her family announced. She had Alzheimer's disease.

Love acted in eight Broadway plays from 1950 to 1960, including "The Member of the Wedding," "The Country Girl," "The Remarkable Mr. Pennypacker" and "Bus Stop."

Besides "Friendly Persuasion," she had a supporting role in the 1961 drama "The Young Doctors."

From the early 1950s to the mid-'70s, Love appeared in dozens of TV shows, ranging from anthology programs like "The Philco Goodyear Television Playhouse," "Playhouse 90" and "Studio One in Hollywood" to such episodic fare as "Gunsmoke," "Perry Mason," "The FBI" "Twilight Zone", and "Bonanza."

Born Dec. 21, 1925, in Des Moines, she studied at what is now Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh and the Actors Studio in New York. Her first marriage, to playwright James McGee, ended in divorce. She married Alan Gooding in 1983.

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Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2011 7:05 am 
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RIP Phyllis Love. :cry:

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Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2011 8:03 am 
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RIP Phyllis :cry: I was re-watching her episode in Ghost Story - Alter-Ego - where she plays the mother opposite Charles Aidman the other night.


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 Post subject: Margaret Field
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2011 3:54 pm 
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Margaret Field O'Mahoney, 89, an actress who gave up her career in movies and television to raise her children, including daughter Sally Field, died Sunday at her home in Malibu after a six-year struggle with cancer, publicist Heidi Schaeffer said.

Using her professional name, Margaret Field, she had small roles in a string of movies from the late 1940s through the '50s, and she starred in the 1941 science fiction thriller "The Man From Planet X." She appeared in dozens of TV series in the '50s and '60s, including "The Gene Autry Show," "Bonanza," "Perry Mason," "The Twilight Zone" and "Yancy Derringer," which starred her then-husband, actor/stuntman Jock Mahoney.

She was born May 10, 1922, in Houston, moved to Pasadena during World War II and signed a contract with Paramount Pictures. She and her first husband, Richard Dryden Field, had two children, Richard and Sally. After their 1950 divorce, she married Mahoney, and they had another daughter, Princess.

Margaret eventually retired from acting to become a full-time mother. In her later years she had lived with her daughter Sally, a two-time Academy Award winner for "Norma Rae" and "Places in the Heart."

-- Los Angeles Times staff reports

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Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2011 10:23 am 
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:cry: RIP Margaret Field :cry:

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Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2011 11:46 pm 
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Check out Obit Patrol for updates:

http://obitpatrol.blogspot.com/


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Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 12:44 pm 
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Alan Sues dies...........



Alan Sues, an actor whose loud, clownish comedic style made him an invaluable cast member on “Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In,” one of the top-rated shows on television in the late 1960s, died on Thursday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 85.
The cause appeared to be a heart attack, Michael Michaud, a friend and administrator for Mr. Sues, said.
On “Laugh-In,” Mr. Sues was part of an ensemble cast in a comedy-sketch show that prefigured “Saturday Night Live” and helped jumpstart the careers of stars like Goldie Hawn, Lily Tomlin and Flip Wilson.
Mr. Sues played Uncle Al the Kiddies’ Pal, a consistently hung-over children’s entertainer; Big Al, an effeminate sportscaster more obsessed with ringing a bell than announcing the day’s action; and a drag imitation of the cast member Jo Anne Worley. He first performed on the show in 1968 as a manic fan who accosts Rowan and Martin with a 30-second recap of a “Laugh-In” episode.

“Laugh-In” combined vaudeville routines, topical and physical humor and jokes in a rapid, stream-of-consciousness format. Episodes began with banter by the hosts, the comedy team of Dan Rowan and Dick Martin, then quickly devolved into a cavalcade of psychedelic sight gags, sketches and bikini-clad dancers punctuated by catchphrases like “Sock it to me!” and “You bet your sweet bippy.”

The show, which first appeared as a special in 1967 and ran until 1973, satirized the counterculture and featured show business guests like Diana Ross as well as public figures like the Rev. Billy Graham and Richard M. Nixon, who, appearing while running for president and trying to shed a stiff image, drew laughs and a few gasps when he asked, “Sock it to me?”

Mr. Sues tended to perform with over-the-top flamboyance on the show, displaying stereotypically gay mannerisms. What he did not disclose was that he was gay, Mr. Michaud said, fearing that to tell the truth about his sexual orientation would have ended his career.

“It wasn’t because he was ashamed of being gay; it was because he was surviving as a performer,” Mr. Michaud said in a telephone interview, adding that Mr. Sues was actually an inspiration to many gay viewers. “Many gay men came up to him and said how important he was when they were young because he was the only gay man they could see on television,” Mr. Michaud said.
Mr. Sues, who left the show before its last season, said his success on “Laugh-In” left him typecast as a wacky comedian.
“When I first started out,” he told The Los Angeles Times in 1993, “I did a lot of straight dramatic roles, but after ‘Laugh-In,’ audiences wouldn’t accept me in anything but a comedy.”
Alan Grigsby Sues was born on March 7, 1926, in Ross, Calif., to Peter and Alice Murray Sues. His father raised racehorses, requiring him to move the family frequently, uprooting Alan and his brother, John, from one school after another. Alan Sues served in the Army in Europe during World War II.

After the war he used veterans’ benefits to pay for acting lessons at the Pasadena Playhouse, where he performed before moving to New York in 1952. He made his Broadway debut in 1953 in Elia Kazan’s “Tea and Sympathy.” He met and married Phyllis Gehrig, a dancer and actress, while the play was running.

When the production ended in 1955, he and his wife started a vaudevillian nightclub act in Manhattan, then took it on the road across the country. Characters he developed for the act would appear in “Laugh-In.”


After they divorced in the late 1950s, Mr. Sues settled in California, where he appeared in “The Masks,” a memorable episode of “The Twilight Zone,” and other television shows and films like “The Americanization of Emily” in 1964.

Later in the ’60s he joined Ms. Worley in the Off Broadway musical comedy revue “The Mad Show.” His performance caught the attention of the producer George Schlatter, who cast him in Edie Adams’s Las Vegas act and then “Laugh-In,” which he was also producing.

Mr. Sues was in New York when he learned Mr. Schlatter wanted to work with him. “When I heard that he wanted to talk to me, I called him in Los Angeles,” Mr. Sues was quoted as saying in “From Beautiful Downtown Burbank: A Critical History of Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, 1968-1973,” by Hal Erickson. “His secretary said he was on the other line, so I said, ‘Well, tell him I’m in a phone booth and it’s filling with water.’ ”

After “Laugh-In,” Mr. Sues appeared in an original one-man play, “No Flies on Me,” in 1993; television shows like “Punky Brewster” and “Sabrina, the Teenage Witch”; and a popular commercial for Peter Pan peanut butter in the early 1970s.

Returning to Broadway in 1975, he had a successful dramatic turn playing Moriarty in the Royal Shakespeare Company’s revival of William Gillette’s “Sherlock Holmes.”

Mr. Sues, who lived in West Hollywood, is survived by a sister-in-law, Yvonne Sues. His brother, John, died several years ago.


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Unread postPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 5:08 pm 
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RIP Alan Seuss :cry:

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 Post subject: Morgan Jones, RIP
Unread postPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 7:34 pm 
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Morgan Jones, 84,
a character actor and Navy veteran who played Commander Donovan in the 1960s adventure TV series "The Blue Angels,"also "Bewitched", "Ironside", "Here's Lucy","Lassie", "Land of the Giants", "The Invaders",
and, of course as Trooper Dan Perry in TZ's Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up? and the Captain in "The Parallel" episodes of our beloved "Twilight Zone"died Jan. 13 at his home in Tarzana, agent Doug Ely said. The cause is undetermined, pending a toxicology report, Ely said.

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Unread postPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 7:43 pm 
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Unread postPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 1:36 pm 
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RIP Mr. Jones :cry:

You do look like a police officer.

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Unread postPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 6:23 pm 
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Hey!! ^^^ that shot is in another room in my apartment!! :twisted:




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Unread postPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2012 11:26 am 
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Hmmmmmmm I see......................

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 Post subject: Warren Stevens, 92
Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2012 9:47 am 
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Warren Stevens, 92, a veteran stage, film and television actor whose most memorable role was his portrayal of "Doc" Ostrow in the 1956 science-fiction movie "Forbidden Planet," died Tuesday at his Sherman Oaks home of respiratory failure. He had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, according to publicist Dale Olson.

Stevens also had a supporting role in 1954's "The Barefoot Contessa" with Humphrey Bogart.

The actor, whose career spanned 60 years, was a familiar face on TV, with regular parts on "Tales of the 77th Bengal Lancers," "The Richard Boone Show" and "Bracken's World," as well as numerous guest appearances on such shows as "Bonanza," "Star Trek" and "Combat."

Born Nov. 2, 1919, in Clark's Summit, Pa., Stevens served in the military during World War II and acted in radio and summer stock in the 1940s.

On Broadway, he appeared in "Detective Story" for more than a year in 1949-50 before signing on with 20th Century Fox.

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Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2012 12:45 pm 
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Good Night, Mr. Stevens.

I was fortunate to meet Warren twice and he was very responsive to his fans.


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Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2012 6:07 pm 
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RIP Mr. Warren Stevens

You were instantly recognizable and gave fantastic performances.

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Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 8:07 am 
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I enjoyed his performances in what I've seen. Good night Mr. Stevens.

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Unread postPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2012 6:54 pm 
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He was in Dead Man's Shoes right? And wasn't he in an episode of the 1985 version of TZ, Welcome to Beaumont maybe?


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Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 6:56 am 
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Yes to both. He played The General in "A Day in Beaumont"


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 Post subject: Garry Walberg, 90
Unread postPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2012 7:31 pm 
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Garry Walberg, 90,
a character actor best known for playing Lt. Frank Monahan on the NBC crime drama "Quincy, M.E." from 1976 to 1983, died March 27 at an assisted-living facility in Northridge of chronic pulmonary obstructive disease and congestive heart failure, his family said. A native of Buffalo, N.Y., Walberg had dozens of TV appearances from the early 1950s to the '90s on such series as "Rawhide," "Star Trek," "The Fugitive," "Peyton Place," "Lassie," "Gunsmoke" and "The Odd Couple.",
and , of course, as Reporter #3 in "The Twilight Zone" episode, "Where is Everybody?"

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Unread postPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 2:32 pm 
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George Lindsey Dead: 'Andy Griffith Show' Actor Known As Goober Pyle Dies At 83


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NASHVILLE, Tenn. — George Lindsey, who spent nearly 30 years as the grinning Goober on "The Andy Griffith Show" and "Hee Haw," has died. He was 83.

The Marshall-Donnelly-Combs Funeral Home in Nashville said Lindsay died early Sunday morning after a brief illness. Funeral arrangements were still being made.

Lindsey was the beanie-wearing Goober on "The Andy Griffith Show" from 1964 to 1968 and its successor, "Mayberry RFD," from 1968 to 1971. He played the same jovial character – a service station attendant – on "Hee Haw" from 1971 until it went out of production in 1993.

"America has grown up with me," Lindsey said in an Associated Press interview in 1985. "Goober is every man; everyone finds something to like about ol' Goober."

He joined "The Andy Griffith Show" in 1964 when Jim Nabors, portraying Gomer Pyle, left the program. Goober Pyle, who had been mentioned on the show as Gomer's cousin, replaced him.

"At that time, we were the best acting ensemble on TV," Lindsey once told an interviewer. "The scripts were terrific. Andy is the best script constructionist I've ever been involved with. And you have to lift your acting level up to his; he's awfully good."

In a statement released through the funeral home, Griffith said, "George Lindsey was my friend. I had great respect for his talent and his human spirit. In recent years, we spoke often by telephone. Our last conversation was a few days ago ... I am happy to say that as we found ourselves in our eighties, we were not afraid to say, `I love you.' That was the last thing George and I had to say to each other. `I love you.'"

Although he was best known as Goober, Lindsey had other roles during a long TV career. Earlier, he often was a "heavy" and once shot Matt Dillon on "Gunsmoke."

His other TV credits included roles on "MASH," `'The Wonderful World of Disney," `'CHIPs," `'The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour," `'The Real McCoys," `'Rifleman," `'The Alfred Hitchcock Hour," `'Twilight Zone" and "Love American Style."




Full article can be found here ------> http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/0 ... 90083.html






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Unread postPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 3:51 pm 
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Well, damn. I was just watching "I am the Night - Color Me Black." R.I.P. George Lindsey.


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Unread postPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 6:55 pm 
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Ah okay, I thought there would be an alert here. I got a beep about this on celebrity death beeper this afternoon as well.


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Unread postPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 6:14 am 
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George Lindsey RIP :cry:

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 Post subject: William Asher, 90
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William Asher, who has 52 credits as a director on his IMDb profile, 15 credits as a producer and 10 as a writer, has died in Palm Desert, CA of complications from Alzheimer’s disease. His credits list may be a bit misleading inasmuch as in several instances they include entire series or numerous episodes. For example, he directed at least 100 episodes of I Love Lucy, 105 episodes of The Patty Duke Show and a whopping 254 episodes of Bewitched, which starred his wife, Elizabeth Montgomery. He also directed the series of “beach” movies starring Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello in the 1960s. For a time in the early ’50s, he was directing two sitcoms simultaneously, Lucy and Our Miss Brooks, starring Eve Arden. He told Palm Springs Life magazine in 1999, “I was in my mid-twenties, unmarried, working on Our Miss Brooks and I Love Lucy, making $1,000 a week from both shows combined. I lived like a drunken sailor! … You can believe I spent the money.”
And, of course, 1960's "Mr Bevis" episode of "The Twilight Zone"

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Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2012 6:45 pm 
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This makes me sad.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/12/24/showbiz/j ... homepage-t

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Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 5:28 pm 
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RIP Jack. Very Sad indeed.


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